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Rioja Rules

Rioja Rules


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A judge's decision about Rioja wines is just one of many wine-region roils

Do you know the difference between the wines of Rioja and La Rioja? A judge in Buenos Aires thinks that you probably do — or that you're smart enough to figure it out. The judge just threw out a 12-year-old case filed on behalf of the Spanish wine region Rioja against the Argentinean region La Rioja — meaning the latter gets to keep its name.

The judge apparently felt that Spanish Riojas, which are predominantly reds made of Tempranillo, and Argentina's La Riojas, which are typically whites made of Torrontes, are easy enough for consumers to distinguish. This isn't the first time that regions or wineries have locked horns over a name — and it certainly won't be the last.

Back in 2005, New Zealand winery Kahurangi Estate had to stop selling its Kiwi White and Kiwi Red brands in Europe when a French winery trademarked the name of its Kiwi Cuvee Sauvignon Blanc made in the Loire Valley. But call it karma: Last year, Kiwi Cuvee was denied the trademark needed for selling the wine Down Under.

Sometimes, though, cool heads prevail. Around the same time as the above fiasco, Chilean winery Viña Santa Rita settled a years-long debate with wineries in California's Santa Rita Hills area of Santa Barbara County. In friendly meetings — instead of a courtroom clash — the California wineries agreed to use the abbreviated designation Sta. Rita Hills on their labels.

Maybe the Rioja and La Rioja guys can all work out their differences, too — and celebrate a deal over Champagne — from France’s region of the same name.

Click here for more from The Daily Sip.


How to Make Reduction Sauces

Last night my wife and I had the privilege to attend the first Lemon Ball to support the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation at the Bellevue in downtown Philadelphia. It was a terrific “yellow-tie” event that raised a lot of money to be used for childhood cancer research.

It was a very moving night with speeches from Jay and Liz Scott, Alex’s parents who spoke on Alex’s fight with cancer and dream to raise millions of dollars so doctors could find a cure by selling lemonade starting with a stand in her front yard.

If you don’t know Alex’s story, I highly recommend you visit the Alex’s Lemonade Stand web site, read all about this incredible little girl who raised over $1 million dollars during her short lifetime and inspired her parents to start the foundation to continue her dream. It is truly amazing and heart warming.

The foundation honored Billy King, President and General Manager of the Philadelphia 76ers who became a close friend to Alex when she just started and was one of her biggest supporters. Then there was a visit and speech from the Gov, Edward G. Rendell.

The Bellevue put out a fine dinner for what looked to be over 500 people. The menu started with Belgian endive and baby mixed greens served with honey-roasted pecans, grapes and crumbled Roquefort cheese and finished with a citrus vinaigrette.

The entrée was filet mignon and Chilean sea bass, leek and mushrooms accompanied by Wasabi potato puree. The waiter came by with a gravy boat filled with a reduction sauce, the subject I would like to talk about.

Before Reduction Sauces

Before everyone was concerned about diets and eating healthier, most sauces were thickened with the help of liaisons, a fancy name for thickening agents. The most popular is a classic roux consisting of a fat (usually butter) and flour although some people will use simple flour and water.

Another popular thickener is cornstarch mixed with a little water or stock. Egg yolks are also used to create a silky texture but if you’re not careful, they can end up as scrambled eggs.

And one of my favorite thickening agents that my doctor tells me I should eliminate from my diet is cream or half and half (half milk/half cream). I have read you can use evaporated milk combined with a starch thickener as a substitute but I really don’t think it would taste the same.

Reduction Sauces

With restaurant goers demanding lower calorie and less fat in their food but still wanting it to taste special, chefs turned to reduction sauces to give them what they want. A reduction is the result of boiling or cooking down a liquid until it reduces to the consistency of a sauce.

The liquid can be just about anything but is usually a wine or a stock that has been used to deglaze a pan where meat, chicken or fish have just been sautéed. (See my article on Pan Sauces)

What’s great about reduction sauces is they are easy to prepare at home and because you are evaporating the water from whatever liquid you are using, you are instantly intensifying the overall flavor of the sauce.

A Basic Reduction Sauce

You can make reductions sauces from all sorts of liquids. One of my favorites is a balsamic reduction sauce where you slowly cook down a cup of balsamic vinegar until it reduces by half or if you like, even further until it becomes syrupy. This is great to drizzle over fish, chicken or pork chops.

Another basic reduction sauce I make a lot at home is a simple pan sauce. Here’s where you saute, lets say a chicken breast, in a saute pan, remove it from the pan, deglaze the pan with some wine, let it cook down to an essence and then add some chicken stock or beef stock.

How much stock should you add?

If you are looking for a cup of sauce, start with two cups of stock. Basically you are going to reduce whatever liquid you are using in half. If you think the sauce should be thicker, continue cooking it down until it reaches your desired consistency.

You will often hear chefs say or cookbooks describe reducing a sauce until it is “thick enough to coat a spoon.” All this means is you dip a spoon in the sauce, and if the sauces sticks, it’s ready. If you reduce the sauce too much, just add a little more stock.

You can read my full description on making pan sauces, but here’s a simple recipe for making a quick reduction sauce at home.


How to Make Reduction Sauces

Last night my wife and I had the privilege to attend the first Lemon Ball to support the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation at the Bellevue in downtown Philadelphia. It was a terrific “yellow-tie” event that raised a lot of money to be used for childhood cancer research.

It was a very moving night with speeches from Jay and Liz Scott, Alex’s parents who spoke on Alex’s fight with cancer and dream to raise millions of dollars so doctors could find a cure by selling lemonade starting with a stand in her front yard.

If you don’t know Alex’s story, I highly recommend you visit the Alex’s Lemonade Stand web site, read all about this incredible little girl who raised over $1 million dollars during her short lifetime and inspired her parents to start the foundation to continue her dream. It is truly amazing and heart warming.

The foundation honored Billy King, President and General Manager of the Philadelphia 76ers who became a close friend to Alex when she just started and was one of her biggest supporters. Then there was a visit and speech from the Gov, Edward G. Rendell.

The Bellevue put out a fine dinner for what looked to be over 500 people. The menu started with Belgian endive and baby mixed greens served with honey-roasted pecans, grapes and crumbled Roquefort cheese and finished with a citrus vinaigrette.

The entrée was filet mignon and Chilean sea bass, leek and mushrooms accompanied by Wasabi potato puree. The waiter came by with a gravy boat filled with a reduction sauce, the subject I would like to talk about.

Before Reduction Sauces

Before everyone was concerned about diets and eating healthier, most sauces were thickened with the help of liaisons, a fancy name for thickening agents. The most popular is a classic roux consisting of a fat (usually butter) and flour although some people will use simple flour and water.

Another popular thickener is cornstarch mixed with a little water or stock. Egg yolks are also used to create a silky texture but if you’re not careful, they can end up as scrambled eggs.

And one of my favorite thickening agents that my doctor tells me I should eliminate from my diet is cream or half and half (half milk/half cream). I have read you can use evaporated milk combined with a starch thickener as a substitute but I really don’t think it would taste the same.

Reduction Sauces

With restaurant goers demanding lower calorie and less fat in their food but still wanting it to taste special, chefs turned to reduction sauces to give them what they want. A reduction is the result of boiling or cooking down a liquid until it reduces to the consistency of a sauce.

The liquid can be just about anything but is usually a wine or a stock that has been used to deglaze a pan where meat, chicken or fish have just been sautéed. (See my article on Pan Sauces)

What’s great about reduction sauces is they are easy to prepare at home and because you are evaporating the water from whatever liquid you are using, you are instantly intensifying the overall flavor of the sauce.

A Basic Reduction Sauce

You can make reductions sauces from all sorts of liquids. One of my favorites is a balsamic reduction sauce where you slowly cook down a cup of balsamic vinegar until it reduces by half or if you like, even further until it becomes syrupy. This is great to drizzle over fish, chicken or pork chops.

Another basic reduction sauce I make a lot at home is a simple pan sauce. Here’s where you saute, lets say a chicken breast, in a saute pan, remove it from the pan, deglaze the pan with some wine, let it cook down to an essence and then add some chicken stock or beef stock.

How much stock should you add?

If you are looking for a cup of sauce, start with two cups of stock. Basically you are going to reduce whatever liquid you are using in half. If you think the sauce should be thicker, continue cooking it down until it reaches your desired consistency.

You will often hear chefs say or cookbooks describe reducing a sauce until it is “thick enough to coat a spoon.” All this means is you dip a spoon in the sauce, and if the sauces sticks, it’s ready. If you reduce the sauce too much, just add a little more stock.

You can read my full description on making pan sauces, but here’s a simple recipe for making a quick reduction sauce at home.


How to Make Reduction Sauces

Last night my wife and I had the privilege to attend the first Lemon Ball to support the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation at the Bellevue in downtown Philadelphia. It was a terrific “yellow-tie” event that raised a lot of money to be used for childhood cancer research.

It was a very moving night with speeches from Jay and Liz Scott, Alex’s parents who spoke on Alex’s fight with cancer and dream to raise millions of dollars so doctors could find a cure by selling lemonade starting with a stand in her front yard.

If you don’t know Alex’s story, I highly recommend you visit the Alex’s Lemonade Stand web site, read all about this incredible little girl who raised over $1 million dollars during her short lifetime and inspired her parents to start the foundation to continue her dream. It is truly amazing and heart warming.

The foundation honored Billy King, President and General Manager of the Philadelphia 76ers who became a close friend to Alex when she just started and was one of her biggest supporters. Then there was a visit and speech from the Gov, Edward G. Rendell.

The Bellevue put out a fine dinner for what looked to be over 500 people. The menu started with Belgian endive and baby mixed greens served with honey-roasted pecans, grapes and crumbled Roquefort cheese and finished with a citrus vinaigrette.

The entrée was filet mignon and Chilean sea bass, leek and mushrooms accompanied by Wasabi potato puree. The waiter came by with a gravy boat filled with a reduction sauce, the subject I would like to talk about.

Before Reduction Sauces

Before everyone was concerned about diets and eating healthier, most sauces were thickened with the help of liaisons, a fancy name for thickening agents. The most popular is a classic roux consisting of a fat (usually butter) and flour although some people will use simple flour and water.

Another popular thickener is cornstarch mixed with a little water or stock. Egg yolks are also used to create a silky texture but if you’re not careful, they can end up as scrambled eggs.

And one of my favorite thickening agents that my doctor tells me I should eliminate from my diet is cream or half and half (half milk/half cream). I have read you can use evaporated milk combined with a starch thickener as a substitute but I really don’t think it would taste the same.

Reduction Sauces

With restaurant goers demanding lower calorie and less fat in their food but still wanting it to taste special, chefs turned to reduction sauces to give them what they want. A reduction is the result of boiling or cooking down a liquid until it reduces to the consistency of a sauce.

The liquid can be just about anything but is usually a wine or a stock that has been used to deglaze a pan where meat, chicken or fish have just been sautéed. (See my article on Pan Sauces)

What’s great about reduction sauces is they are easy to prepare at home and because you are evaporating the water from whatever liquid you are using, you are instantly intensifying the overall flavor of the sauce.

A Basic Reduction Sauce

You can make reductions sauces from all sorts of liquids. One of my favorites is a balsamic reduction sauce where you slowly cook down a cup of balsamic vinegar until it reduces by half or if you like, even further until it becomes syrupy. This is great to drizzle over fish, chicken or pork chops.

Another basic reduction sauce I make a lot at home is a simple pan sauce. Here’s where you saute, lets say a chicken breast, in a saute pan, remove it from the pan, deglaze the pan with some wine, let it cook down to an essence and then add some chicken stock or beef stock.

How much stock should you add?

If you are looking for a cup of sauce, start with two cups of stock. Basically you are going to reduce whatever liquid you are using in half. If you think the sauce should be thicker, continue cooking it down until it reaches your desired consistency.

You will often hear chefs say or cookbooks describe reducing a sauce until it is “thick enough to coat a spoon.” All this means is you dip a spoon in the sauce, and if the sauces sticks, it’s ready. If you reduce the sauce too much, just add a little more stock.

You can read my full description on making pan sauces, but here’s a simple recipe for making a quick reduction sauce at home.


How to Make Reduction Sauces

Last night my wife and I had the privilege to attend the first Lemon Ball to support the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation at the Bellevue in downtown Philadelphia. It was a terrific “yellow-tie” event that raised a lot of money to be used for childhood cancer research.

It was a very moving night with speeches from Jay and Liz Scott, Alex’s parents who spoke on Alex’s fight with cancer and dream to raise millions of dollars so doctors could find a cure by selling lemonade starting with a stand in her front yard.

If you don’t know Alex’s story, I highly recommend you visit the Alex’s Lemonade Stand web site, read all about this incredible little girl who raised over $1 million dollars during her short lifetime and inspired her parents to start the foundation to continue her dream. It is truly amazing and heart warming.

The foundation honored Billy King, President and General Manager of the Philadelphia 76ers who became a close friend to Alex when she just started and was one of her biggest supporters. Then there was a visit and speech from the Gov, Edward G. Rendell.

The Bellevue put out a fine dinner for what looked to be over 500 people. The menu started with Belgian endive and baby mixed greens served with honey-roasted pecans, grapes and crumbled Roquefort cheese and finished with a citrus vinaigrette.

The entrée was filet mignon and Chilean sea bass, leek and mushrooms accompanied by Wasabi potato puree. The waiter came by with a gravy boat filled with a reduction sauce, the subject I would like to talk about.

Before Reduction Sauces

Before everyone was concerned about diets and eating healthier, most sauces were thickened with the help of liaisons, a fancy name for thickening agents. The most popular is a classic roux consisting of a fat (usually butter) and flour although some people will use simple flour and water.

Another popular thickener is cornstarch mixed with a little water or stock. Egg yolks are also used to create a silky texture but if you’re not careful, they can end up as scrambled eggs.

And one of my favorite thickening agents that my doctor tells me I should eliminate from my diet is cream or half and half (half milk/half cream). I have read you can use evaporated milk combined with a starch thickener as a substitute but I really don’t think it would taste the same.

Reduction Sauces

With restaurant goers demanding lower calorie and less fat in their food but still wanting it to taste special, chefs turned to reduction sauces to give them what they want. A reduction is the result of boiling or cooking down a liquid until it reduces to the consistency of a sauce.

The liquid can be just about anything but is usually a wine or a stock that has been used to deglaze a pan where meat, chicken or fish have just been sautéed. (See my article on Pan Sauces)

What’s great about reduction sauces is they are easy to prepare at home and because you are evaporating the water from whatever liquid you are using, you are instantly intensifying the overall flavor of the sauce.

A Basic Reduction Sauce

You can make reductions sauces from all sorts of liquids. One of my favorites is a balsamic reduction sauce where you slowly cook down a cup of balsamic vinegar until it reduces by half or if you like, even further until it becomes syrupy. This is great to drizzle over fish, chicken or pork chops.

Another basic reduction sauce I make a lot at home is a simple pan sauce. Here’s where you saute, lets say a chicken breast, in a saute pan, remove it from the pan, deglaze the pan with some wine, let it cook down to an essence and then add some chicken stock or beef stock.

How much stock should you add?

If you are looking for a cup of sauce, start with two cups of stock. Basically you are going to reduce whatever liquid you are using in half. If you think the sauce should be thicker, continue cooking it down until it reaches your desired consistency.

You will often hear chefs say or cookbooks describe reducing a sauce until it is “thick enough to coat a spoon.” All this means is you dip a spoon in the sauce, and if the sauces sticks, it’s ready. If you reduce the sauce too much, just add a little more stock.

You can read my full description on making pan sauces, but here’s a simple recipe for making a quick reduction sauce at home.


How to Make Reduction Sauces

Last night my wife and I had the privilege to attend the first Lemon Ball to support the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation at the Bellevue in downtown Philadelphia. It was a terrific “yellow-tie” event that raised a lot of money to be used for childhood cancer research.

It was a very moving night with speeches from Jay and Liz Scott, Alex’s parents who spoke on Alex’s fight with cancer and dream to raise millions of dollars so doctors could find a cure by selling lemonade starting with a stand in her front yard.

If you don’t know Alex’s story, I highly recommend you visit the Alex’s Lemonade Stand web site, read all about this incredible little girl who raised over $1 million dollars during her short lifetime and inspired her parents to start the foundation to continue her dream. It is truly amazing and heart warming.

The foundation honored Billy King, President and General Manager of the Philadelphia 76ers who became a close friend to Alex when she just started and was one of her biggest supporters. Then there was a visit and speech from the Gov, Edward G. Rendell.

The Bellevue put out a fine dinner for what looked to be over 500 people. The menu started with Belgian endive and baby mixed greens served with honey-roasted pecans, grapes and crumbled Roquefort cheese and finished with a citrus vinaigrette.

The entrée was filet mignon and Chilean sea bass, leek and mushrooms accompanied by Wasabi potato puree. The waiter came by with a gravy boat filled with a reduction sauce, the subject I would like to talk about.

Before Reduction Sauces

Before everyone was concerned about diets and eating healthier, most sauces were thickened with the help of liaisons, a fancy name for thickening agents. The most popular is a classic roux consisting of a fat (usually butter) and flour although some people will use simple flour and water.

Another popular thickener is cornstarch mixed with a little water or stock. Egg yolks are also used to create a silky texture but if you’re not careful, they can end up as scrambled eggs.

And one of my favorite thickening agents that my doctor tells me I should eliminate from my diet is cream or half and half (half milk/half cream). I have read you can use evaporated milk combined with a starch thickener as a substitute but I really don’t think it would taste the same.

Reduction Sauces

With restaurant goers demanding lower calorie and less fat in their food but still wanting it to taste special, chefs turned to reduction sauces to give them what they want. A reduction is the result of boiling or cooking down a liquid until it reduces to the consistency of a sauce.

The liquid can be just about anything but is usually a wine or a stock that has been used to deglaze a pan where meat, chicken or fish have just been sautéed. (See my article on Pan Sauces)

What’s great about reduction sauces is they are easy to prepare at home and because you are evaporating the water from whatever liquid you are using, you are instantly intensifying the overall flavor of the sauce.

A Basic Reduction Sauce

You can make reductions sauces from all sorts of liquids. One of my favorites is a balsamic reduction sauce where you slowly cook down a cup of balsamic vinegar until it reduces by half or if you like, even further until it becomes syrupy. This is great to drizzle over fish, chicken or pork chops.

Another basic reduction sauce I make a lot at home is a simple pan sauce. Here’s where you saute, lets say a chicken breast, in a saute pan, remove it from the pan, deglaze the pan with some wine, let it cook down to an essence and then add some chicken stock or beef stock.

How much stock should you add?

If you are looking for a cup of sauce, start with two cups of stock. Basically you are going to reduce whatever liquid you are using in half. If you think the sauce should be thicker, continue cooking it down until it reaches your desired consistency.

You will often hear chefs say or cookbooks describe reducing a sauce until it is “thick enough to coat a spoon.” All this means is you dip a spoon in the sauce, and if the sauces sticks, it’s ready. If you reduce the sauce too much, just add a little more stock.

You can read my full description on making pan sauces, but here’s a simple recipe for making a quick reduction sauce at home.


How to Make Reduction Sauces

Last night my wife and I had the privilege to attend the first Lemon Ball to support the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation at the Bellevue in downtown Philadelphia. It was a terrific “yellow-tie” event that raised a lot of money to be used for childhood cancer research.

It was a very moving night with speeches from Jay and Liz Scott, Alex’s parents who spoke on Alex’s fight with cancer and dream to raise millions of dollars so doctors could find a cure by selling lemonade starting with a stand in her front yard.

If you don’t know Alex’s story, I highly recommend you visit the Alex’s Lemonade Stand web site, read all about this incredible little girl who raised over $1 million dollars during her short lifetime and inspired her parents to start the foundation to continue her dream. It is truly amazing and heart warming.

The foundation honored Billy King, President and General Manager of the Philadelphia 76ers who became a close friend to Alex when she just started and was one of her biggest supporters. Then there was a visit and speech from the Gov, Edward G. Rendell.

The Bellevue put out a fine dinner for what looked to be over 500 people. The menu started with Belgian endive and baby mixed greens served with honey-roasted pecans, grapes and crumbled Roquefort cheese and finished with a citrus vinaigrette.

The entrée was filet mignon and Chilean sea bass, leek and mushrooms accompanied by Wasabi potato puree. The waiter came by with a gravy boat filled with a reduction sauce, the subject I would like to talk about.

Before Reduction Sauces

Before everyone was concerned about diets and eating healthier, most sauces were thickened with the help of liaisons, a fancy name for thickening agents. The most popular is a classic roux consisting of a fat (usually butter) and flour although some people will use simple flour and water.

Another popular thickener is cornstarch mixed with a little water or stock. Egg yolks are also used to create a silky texture but if you’re not careful, they can end up as scrambled eggs.

And one of my favorite thickening agents that my doctor tells me I should eliminate from my diet is cream or half and half (half milk/half cream). I have read you can use evaporated milk combined with a starch thickener as a substitute but I really don’t think it would taste the same.

Reduction Sauces

With restaurant goers demanding lower calorie and less fat in their food but still wanting it to taste special, chefs turned to reduction sauces to give them what they want. A reduction is the result of boiling or cooking down a liquid until it reduces to the consistency of a sauce.

The liquid can be just about anything but is usually a wine or a stock that has been used to deglaze a pan where meat, chicken or fish have just been sautéed. (See my article on Pan Sauces)

What’s great about reduction sauces is they are easy to prepare at home and because you are evaporating the water from whatever liquid you are using, you are instantly intensifying the overall flavor of the sauce.

A Basic Reduction Sauce

You can make reductions sauces from all sorts of liquids. One of my favorites is a balsamic reduction sauce where you slowly cook down a cup of balsamic vinegar until it reduces by half or if you like, even further until it becomes syrupy. This is great to drizzle over fish, chicken or pork chops.

Another basic reduction sauce I make a lot at home is a simple pan sauce. Here’s where you saute, lets say a chicken breast, in a saute pan, remove it from the pan, deglaze the pan with some wine, let it cook down to an essence and then add some chicken stock or beef stock.

How much stock should you add?

If you are looking for a cup of sauce, start with two cups of stock. Basically you are going to reduce whatever liquid you are using in half. If you think the sauce should be thicker, continue cooking it down until it reaches your desired consistency.

You will often hear chefs say or cookbooks describe reducing a sauce until it is “thick enough to coat a spoon.” All this means is you dip a spoon in the sauce, and if the sauces sticks, it’s ready. If you reduce the sauce too much, just add a little more stock.

You can read my full description on making pan sauces, but here’s a simple recipe for making a quick reduction sauce at home.


How to Make Reduction Sauces

Last night my wife and I had the privilege to attend the first Lemon Ball to support the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation at the Bellevue in downtown Philadelphia. It was a terrific “yellow-tie” event that raised a lot of money to be used for childhood cancer research.

It was a very moving night with speeches from Jay and Liz Scott, Alex’s parents who spoke on Alex’s fight with cancer and dream to raise millions of dollars so doctors could find a cure by selling lemonade starting with a stand in her front yard.

If you don’t know Alex’s story, I highly recommend you visit the Alex’s Lemonade Stand web site, read all about this incredible little girl who raised over $1 million dollars during her short lifetime and inspired her parents to start the foundation to continue her dream. It is truly amazing and heart warming.

The foundation honored Billy King, President and General Manager of the Philadelphia 76ers who became a close friend to Alex when she just started and was one of her biggest supporters. Then there was a visit and speech from the Gov, Edward G. Rendell.

The Bellevue put out a fine dinner for what looked to be over 500 people. The menu started with Belgian endive and baby mixed greens served with honey-roasted pecans, grapes and crumbled Roquefort cheese and finished with a citrus vinaigrette.

The entrée was filet mignon and Chilean sea bass, leek and mushrooms accompanied by Wasabi potato puree. The waiter came by with a gravy boat filled with a reduction sauce, the subject I would like to talk about.

Before Reduction Sauces

Before everyone was concerned about diets and eating healthier, most sauces were thickened with the help of liaisons, a fancy name for thickening agents. The most popular is a classic roux consisting of a fat (usually butter) and flour although some people will use simple flour and water.

Another popular thickener is cornstarch mixed with a little water or stock. Egg yolks are also used to create a silky texture but if you’re not careful, they can end up as scrambled eggs.

And one of my favorite thickening agents that my doctor tells me I should eliminate from my diet is cream or half and half (half milk/half cream). I have read you can use evaporated milk combined with a starch thickener as a substitute but I really don’t think it would taste the same.

Reduction Sauces

With restaurant goers demanding lower calorie and less fat in their food but still wanting it to taste special, chefs turned to reduction sauces to give them what they want. A reduction is the result of boiling or cooking down a liquid until it reduces to the consistency of a sauce.

The liquid can be just about anything but is usually a wine or a stock that has been used to deglaze a pan where meat, chicken or fish have just been sautéed. (See my article on Pan Sauces)

What’s great about reduction sauces is they are easy to prepare at home and because you are evaporating the water from whatever liquid you are using, you are instantly intensifying the overall flavor of the sauce.

A Basic Reduction Sauce

You can make reductions sauces from all sorts of liquids. One of my favorites is a balsamic reduction sauce where you slowly cook down a cup of balsamic vinegar until it reduces by half or if you like, even further until it becomes syrupy. This is great to drizzle over fish, chicken or pork chops.

Another basic reduction sauce I make a lot at home is a simple pan sauce. Here’s where you saute, lets say a chicken breast, in a saute pan, remove it from the pan, deglaze the pan with some wine, let it cook down to an essence and then add some chicken stock or beef stock.

How much stock should you add?

If you are looking for a cup of sauce, start with two cups of stock. Basically you are going to reduce whatever liquid you are using in half. If you think the sauce should be thicker, continue cooking it down until it reaches your desired consistency.

You will often hear chefs say or cookbooks describe reducing a sauce until it is “thick enough to coat a spoon.” All this means is you dip a spoon in the sauce, and if the sauces sticks, it’s ready. If you reduce the sauce too much, just add a little more stock.

You can read my full description on making pan sauces, but here’s a simple recipe for making a quick reduction sauce at home.


How to Make Reduction Sauces

Last night my wife and I had the privilege to attend the first Lemon Ball to support the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation at the Bellevue in downtown Philadelphia. It was a terrific “yellow-tie” event that raised a lot of money to be used for childhood cancer research.

It was a very moving night with speeches from Jay and Liz Scott, Alex’s parents who spoke on Alex’s fight with cancer and dream to raise millions of dollars so doctors could find a cure by selling lemonade starting with a stand in her front yard.

If you don’t know Alex’s story, I highly recommend you visit the Alex’s Lemonade Stand web site, read all about this incredible little girl who raised over $1 million dollars during her short lifetime and inspired her parents to start the foundation to continue her dream. It is truly amazing and heart warming.

The foundation honored Billy King, President and General Manager of the Philadelphia 76ers who became a close friend to Alex when she just started and was one of her biggest supporters. Then there was a visit and speech from the Gov, Edward G. Rendell.

The Bellevue put out a fine dinner for what looked to be over 500 people. The menu started with Belgian endive and baby mixed greens served with honey-roasted pecans, grapes and crumbled Roquefort cheese and finished with a citrus vinaigrette.

The entrée was filet mignon and Chilean sea bass, leek and mushrooms accompanied by Wasabi potato puree. The waiter came by with a gravy boat filled with a reduction sauce, the subject I would like to talk about.

Before Reduction Sauces

Before everyone was concerned about diets and eating healthier, most sauces were thickened with the help of liaisons, a fancy name for thickening agents. The most popular is a classic roux consisting of a fat (usually butter) and flour although some people will use simple flour and water.

Another popular thickener is cornstarch mixed with a little water or stock. Egg yolks are also used to create a silky texture but if you’re not careful, they can end up as scrambled eggs.

And one of my favorite thickening agents that my doctor tells me I should eliminate from my diet is cream or half and half (half milk/half cream). I have read you can use evaporated milk combined with a starch thickener as a substitute but I really don’t think it would taste the same.

Reduction Sauces

With restaurant goers demanding lower calorie and less fat in their food but still wanting it to taste special, chefs turned to reduction sauces to give them what they want. A reduction is the result of boiling or cooking down a liquid until it reduces to the consistency of a sauce.

The liquid can be just about anything but is usually a wine or a stock that has been used to deglaze a pan where meat, chicken or fish have just been sautéed. (See my article on Pan Sauces)

What’s great about reduction sauces is they are easy to prepare at home and because you are evaporating the water from whatever liquid you are using, you are instantly intensifying the overall flavor of the sauce.

A Basic Reduction Sauce

You can make reductions sauces from all sorts of liquids. One of my favorites is a balsamic reduction sauce where you slowly cook down a cup of balsamic vinegar until it reduces by half or if you like, even further until it becomes syrupy. This is great to drizzle over fish, chicken or pork chops.

Another basic reduction sauce I make a lot at home is a simple pan sauce. Here’s where you saute, lets say a chicken breast, in a saute pan, remove it from the pan, deglaze the pan with some wine, let it cook down to an essence and then add some chicken stock or beef stock.

How much stock should you add?

If you are looking for a cup of sauce, start with two cups of stock. Basically you are going to reduce whatever liquid you are using in half. If you think the sauce should be thicker, continue cooking it down until it reaches your desired consistency.

You will often hear chefs say or cookbooks describe reducing a sauce until it is “thick enough to coat a spoon.” All this means is you dip a spoon in the sauce, and if the sauces sticks, it’s ready. If you reduce the sauce too much, just add a little more stock.

You can read my full description on making pan sauces, but here’s a simple recipe for making a quick reduction sauce at home.


How to Make Reduction Sauces

Last night my wife and I had the privilege to attend the first Lemon Ball to support the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation at the Bellevue in downtown Philadelphia. It was a terrific “yellow-tie” event that raised a lot of money to be used for childhood cancer research.

It was a very moving night with speeches from Jay and Liz Scott, Alex’s parents who spoke on Alex’s fight with cancer and dream to raise millions of dollars so doctors could find a cure by selling lemonade starting with a stand in her front yard.

If you don’t know Alex’s story, I highly recommend you visit the Alex’s Lemonade Stand web site, read all about this incredible little girl who raised over $1 million dollars during her short lifetime and inspired her parents to start the foundation to continue her dream. It is truly amazing and heart warming.

The foundation honored Billy King, President and General Manager of the Philadelphia 76ers who became a close friend to Alex when she just started and was one of her biggest supporters. Then there was a visit and speech from the Gov, Edward G. Rendell.

The Bellevue put out a fine dinner for what looked to be over 500 people. The menu started with Belgian endive and baby mixed greens served with honey-roasted pecans, grapes and crumbled Roquefort cheese and finished with a citrus vinaigrette.

The entrée was filet mignon and Chilean sea bass, leek and mushrooms accompanied by Wasabi potato puree. The waiter came by with a gravy boat filled with a reduction sauce, the subject I would like to talk about.

Before Reduction Sauces

Before everyone was concerned about diets and eating healthier, most sauces were thickened with the help of liaisons, a fancy name for thickening agents. The most popular is a classic roux consisting of a fat (usually butter) and flour although some people will use simple flour and water.

Another popular thickener is cornstarch mixed with a little water or stock. Egg yolks are also used to create a silky texture but if you’re not careful, they can end up as scrambled eggs.

And one of my favorite thickening agents that my doctor tells me I should eliminate from my diet is cream or half and half (half milk/half cream). I have read you can use evaporated milk combined with a starch thickener as a substitute but I really don’t think it would taste the same.

Reduction Sauces

With restaurant goers demanding lower calorie and less fat in their food but still wanting it to taste special, chefs turned to reduction sauces to give them what they want. A reduction is the result of boiling or cooking down a liquid until it reduces to the consistency of a sauce.

The liquid can be just about anything but is usually a wine or a stock that has been used to deglaze a pan where meat, chicken or fish have just been sautéed. (See my article on Pan Sauces)

What’s great about reduction sauces is they are easy to prepare at home and because you are evaporating the water from whatever liquid you are using, you are instantly intensifying the overall flavor of the sauce.

A Basic Reduction Sauce

You can make reductions sauces from all sorts of liquids. One of my favorites is a balsamic reduction sauce where you slowly cook down a cup of balsamic vinegar until it reduces by half or if you like, even further until it becomes syrupy. This is great to drizzle over fish, chicken or pork chops.

Another basic reduction sauce I make a lot at home is a simple pan sauce. Here’s where you saute, lets say a chicken breast, in a saute pan, remove it from the pan, deglaze the pan with some wine, let it cook down to an essence and then add some chicken stock or beef stock.

How much stock should you add?

If you are looking for a cup of sauce, start with two cups of stock. Basically you are going to reduce whatever liquid you are using in half. If you think the sauce should be thicker, continue cooking it down until it reaches your desired consistency.

You will often hear chefs say or cookbooks describe reducing a sauce until it is “thick enough to coat a spoon.” All this means is you dip a spoon in the sauce, and if the sauces sticks, it’s ready. If you reduce the sauce too much, just add a little more stock.

You can read my full description on making pan sauces, but here’s a simple recipe for making a quick reduction sauce at home.


How to Make Reduction Sauces

Last night my wife and I had the privilege to attend the first Lemon Ball to support the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation at the Bellevue in downtown Philadelphia. It was a terrific “yellow-tie” event that raised a lot of money to be used for childhood cancer research.

It was a very moving night with speeches from Jay and Liz Scott, Alex’s parents who spoke on Alex’s fight with cancer and dream to raise millions of dollars so doctors could find a cure by selling lemonade starting with a stand in her front yard.

If you don’t know Alex’s story, I highly recommend you visit the Alex’s Lemonade Stand web site, read all about this incredible little girl who raised over $1 million dollars during her short lifetime and inspired her parents to start the foundation to continue her dream. It is truly amazing and heart warming.

The foundation honored Billy King, President and General Manager of the Philadelphia 76ers who became a close friend to Alex when she just started and was one of her biggest supporters. Then there was a visit and speech from the Gov, Edward G. Rendell.

The Bellevue put out a fine dinner for what looked to be over 500 people. The menu started with Belgian endive and baby mixed greens served with honey-roasted pecans, grapes and crumbled Roquefort cheese and finished with a citrus vinaigrette.

The entrée was filet mignon and Chilean sea bass, leek and mushrooms accompanied by Wasabi potato puree. The waiter came by with a gravy boat filled with a reduction sauce, the subject I would like to talk about.

Before Reduction Sauces

Before everyone was concerned about diets and eating healthier, most sauces were thickened with the help of liaisons, a fancy name for thickening agents. The most popular is a classic roux consisting of a fat (usually butter) and flour although some people will use simple flour and water.

Another popular thickener is cornstarch mixed with a little water or stock. Egg yolks are also used to create a silky texture but if you’re not careful, they can end up as scrambled eggs.

And one of my favorite thickening agents that my doctor tells me I should eliminate from my diet is cream or half and half (half milk/half cream). I have read you can use evaporated milk combined with a starch thickener as a substitute but I really don’t think it would taste the same.

Reduction Sauces

With restaurant goers demanding lower calorie and less fat in their food but still wanting it to taste special, chefs turned to reduction sauces to give them what they want. A reduction is the result of boiling or cooking down a liquid until it reduces to the consistency of a sauce.

The liquid can be just about anything but is usually a wine or a stock that has been used to deglaze a pan where meat, chicken or fish have just been sautéed. (See my article on Pan Sauces)

What’s great about reduction sauces is they are easy to prepare at home and because you are evaporating the water from whatever liquid you are using, you are instantly intensifying the overall flavor of the sauce.

A Basic Reduction Sauce

You can make reductions sauces from all sorts of liquids. One of my favorites is a balsamic reduction sauce where you slowly cook down a cup of balsamic vinegar until it reduces by half or if you like, even further until it becomes syrupy. This is great to drizzle over fish, chicken or pork chops.

Another basic reduction sauce I make a lot at home is a simple pan sauce. Here’s where you saute, lets say a chicken breast, in a saute pan, remove it from the pan, deglaze the pan with some wine, let it cook down to an essence and then add some chicken stock or beef stock.

How much stock should you add?

If you are looking for a cup of sauce, start with two cups of stock. Basically you are going to reduce whatever liquid you are using in half. If you think the sauce should be thicker, continue cooking it down until it reaches your desired consistency.

You will often hear chefs say or cookbooks describe reducing a sauce until it is “thick enough to coat a spoon.” All this means is you dip a spoon in the sauce, and if the sauces sticks, it’s ready. If you reduce the sauce too much, just add a little more stock.

You can read my full description on making pan sauces, but here’s a simple recipe for making a quick reduction sauce at home.


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